Here are the latest Numismatic Stories from around the world – Click Here

On this page of my blog, I will add the latest numismatic stories I find searching the internet. Please come back often.

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9 thoughts on “Here are the latest Numismatic Stories from around the world – Click Here

  1. Top 5 US Coins that Sold in the Heritage Long Beach Auction

    LOT #3798 1792 Copper Disme, Judd-10

    Sold: $211,500

    ha_lb15_copper_disme_11792 P10C Disme, Judd-10, Pollock-11, XF40 PCGS Secure. Ex: Wurtzbach, Donald G. Partrick Collection. 57.0 grains. This was the 1914 ANS Exhibition Plate Coin.

    Along with technical aspects of coinage, the Mint in 1792 experimented with visual representations of Liberty. Three distinct styles emerge. The Birch cents and the half disme present Liberty with loose and curly hair, while the Eagle-on-Globe quarters depict a neatly coifed and braided Liberty. Finally, the Silver Center cents, Fusible Alloy cents, and dismes adorn Liberty’s head with straighter, flowing hair. All three approaches find similarities within contemporary art. The Liberty of the Eagle-on-Globe quarter compares favorably to that of Samuel Jennings’ 1792 painting “Liberty Displaying the Arts and Sciences,” today reposing in the reading room of the Library Company of Philadelphia. Liberty is virginal, slender, and personifies the association between learning and liberty. The painting is somewhat evocative of the motto LIBERTY PARENT OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY as books, scientific instruments, and symbols of artistic endeavor are placed at Liberty’s feet, squarely within her dominion.

    Click the below link for the rest of the article:

    Top 5 US Coins that Sold in the Heritage Long Beach Auction

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  2. Space-themed world coins more popular than everYouthful interests in coins and space exploration converge

    By Louis Golino , Special to Coin World
    Published : 09/21/15ShareEmail
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    A 2009 coin program from the Monnaie de Paris marking the International Year of Astronomy was popular because it not only coincided with the 40th anniversary of the Moon landing, but was created to mimic the moon’s shape. Enlarge
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    A 2009 coin program from the Monnaie de Paris marking the International Year of Astronomy was popular because it not only coincided with the 40th anniversary of the Moon landing, but was created to mimic the moon’s shape.
    Images courtesy of the Monnaie de Paris.
    Editor’s note: The following is the first of a multi-part Coin World series about the prominence of space-themed collector coins from all over the world prepared by Louis Golino for the October 2015 monthly edition.

    The two most important attributes of a modern coin for the typical collector are the coin’s theme and design. A collector who finds those aspects of a coin compelling and complementary is likely to want the coin.

    Of the myriad themes depicted on modern world issues, astronomy and space are certainly among the most popular.

    Exactly why so many coin collectors have an interest in astronomy is unclear, but it could have something to do with the fact that many people started collecting coins when they were children. Children are often fascinated by space travel, the solar system, and the planets, especially if they were young when the Apollo 11 landed on the moon in 1969, or at the time of John Glenn’s space orbit in 1962.

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    Space-themed world coins more popular than everYouthful interests in coins and space exploration converge

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  3. Electrum coins weren’t just issued early on: Ancients Today
    Cities still use alloy after switch to pure gold and silver

    By David Vagi , Special to Coin World
    Published : 09/21/15

    The story of the world’s first coins, seemingly introduced in the mid-seventh century B.C. and made of “white gold” electrum, is well known. This alloy of gold and silver earned its name from its pale yellow color, which resembled amber, called “electron” in Greek.

    Though electrum was the exclusive metal for the earliest phase of coinage, by the end of the sixth century B.C. it largely had been supplanted by issues of pure gold and pure silver. Even so, the period of greatest production for electrum coinage in Asia Minor was from about the 520s to the 320s B.C. — exactly when one might have expected electrum coinage to have died out.

    After this early period occasional, isolated issues of electrum emerged from a number of mints, which supplemented some extremely large issues from three cities in Asia Minor: Cyzicus, Phocaea and Mytilene. Remarkably, these cities found economic advantage in using electrum at a time when the rest of the Greek world had largely come to prefer silver or gold.

    The most important issuer of electrum coins in the Greek world was Cyzicus, a wealthy port on the southern shore of the Bosporus, the strait that links the Black Sea with the Aegean. Its ideal location allowed the city’s merchants to grow wealthy from their near-monopoly on trade between Greece and the distant shores of the Black Sea.

    The principal trade coin of Cyzicus from the late seventh through the late fourth Century B.C. was the electrum stater. This coin of about 16 grams was widely accepted in commerce, and in ancient inscriptions it was often referred to by its familiar nickname “Cyzicene.” Although electrum fractional denominations were also produced at Cyzicus, they were for local or regional use, and seldom were exported.

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    Electrum coins weren’t just issued early on: Ancients Today

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  4. Constellations, scientists, and stars among special space coin subjects
    Technology adds dimension, substance to space-themed coins

    Editor’s note: The following is the second part of a multi-part Coin World series about the prominence of space-themed collector coins from all over the world prepared by Louis Golino for the October 2015 monthly edition of Coin World.

    Technology is being used to shape coins to resemble constellations and to even to include pieces of meteors that crashed through the Earth’s atmosphere.

    Star constellations

    In 2012 the Royal Australian Mint issued another world first: the first colored and dome-shaped modern coin, the Southern Crux star constellation silver $5 coin, which was the first in a three-coin award-winning series focused on Southern Sky constellations.

    The 2012 coin was an instant hit with collectors and sold out of its mintage of 10,000 coins quite quickly. Issued at a price of about $100, the coin sells today for $500 or more, which is not typical for modern world coins — they actually decline in value in many cases.

    It is also worth remembering that the 2009 French and 2012 Australian curved coins were so well made and at the time so unique that they served as models for the U.S. Mint’s production of the baseball coins.

    Click the below link to read the entire article:

    Constellations, scientists, and stars among special space coin subjects

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  5. Harlan J. Berk Launches 195th Buy or Bid Sale. Video: 7:47

    Harlan J. Berk….

    Harlan J. Berk has announced their 195th Buy or Bid sale with 560 lots of ancient coins, 20 world coins, 38 antiquities & 10 antique maps. Many of the coins in the sale were acquired recently at the American Numismatic Association’s World’s Fair of Money in Rosemont, Illinois.

    Click the link below to read the entire article:

    http://www.coinweek.com/coins/news/harlan-j-berk-launches-195th-buy-or-bid-sale-video-747/

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  6. Pope Francis is visiting the U.S. this week and honorary medals are available: Coin World Buzz

    1. The Pope and his medals

    As Pope Francis travels to the U.S. this week for the first time, the Pennsylvania Association of Numismatists’ commemorative medals marking the historic visit are still available.

    “The essence of the medal focuses on the Pope’s visit to Washington, D.C., Sept. 23, 2015,” a PAN release published by Coin World on Sept. 14 reads. “[Designer] Don Everhart produced a beautiful image of Pope Francis that captures his warmth and charm on the obverse and a reverse that features three Washington, D.C., iconic domes, the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle, and the dome of the U.S. Capitol building.”

    The medals, which were produced by the Northwest Territorial Mint, feature bronze and silver, some with gold and/or black enamel embellishments.

    Prices for the medals vary. The 3-inch silver medal with black enamel and 24-karat gold embellishment boasts the highest price tag at $450.

    The 1.75-inch bronze medal is $30. In total, four medal versions are available.

    Click the below link to read the full article:

    Pope Francis is visiting the U.S. this week and honorary medals are available: Coin World Buzz

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  7. American Precious Metals Exchange issues first coins in Vikings: Gods, Kings, Warriors series from Scottsdale

    A new coin series from Niue celebrates Viking rulers and legends.

    Vikings: Gods, Kings and Warriors is a 15-coin series struck by the Scottsdale Mint and available exclusively through American Precious Metals Exchange. The first three coins were released Sept. 16.

    Vikings conquered, plundered and reigned equally over land and sea, attaining notoriety as valiant, seafaring warriors. Their triumphs and expansion are well known, but their divine inspirations and leaders are lesser known, despite a surge in popularity in recent years credited to the History Channel television show called Vikings, now in its fourth season.

    The creative team at Scottsdale Mint brings Valhalla (Norse mythology’s “hall of the slain”), its inhabitants, and its worshippers to life in the new series.

    The series depicts 15 of the Norse culture’s greatest figures: Odin, Ragnar, King Cnut, Thor, Loki, Tyr, Freya, Ivar the Boneless, Eric Bloodaxe, Harald Hardrada, Bjorn Ironside, Egil Skallagrimsson, Freydís Eiríksdóttir, Harald Fairhair, and Gudfred.

    The first three 2015 silver coins, celebrating Odin, King Cnut and Ragnar, have been released together and will be available in the United States exclusively during a 30-day period through APMEX.

    Click the below link to read the rest of the article:

    American Precious Metals Exchange issues first coins in Vikings: Gods, Kings, Warriors series from Scottsdale

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  8. Classic U.S. Coins for less than $500 each, Part 17: Gem Early Lincoln Cents

    A Weekly CoinWeek Column by Greg Reynolds ……..

    The most popular of all U.S. coins are Lincoln cents, which have been minted from 1909 to the present. A wide assortment of these may still be collected from change. Furthermore, circulated representatives of many, relatively scarce early dates can be purchased at small coin shows for less than $1 each. Although there are several practical approaches to collecting Lincoln cents, the current topic is collecting gem quality, pre-1934 Lincoln cents, those that grade MS-65 or higher, for less than $500 each.

    In the realm of U.S. coins, a large percentage of current collectors assembled sets of Lincoln cents before considering other types of coins. When I was a kid, most of my friends collected Lincoln cents. Gem quality early Lincoln cents have a devoted following, partly because collectors of circulated Lincoln cents in the past wish to now assemble sets of the coins that they were so enthusiastic about when they began collecting.

    Classic U.S. Coins for less than $500 each, Part 17: Gem Early Lincoln Cents

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  9. By Steve Roach , Coin World
    Published : 10/06/15

    When collectors think of the key Morgan dollars, dates like the 1889-CC, 1893-S and Proof-only 1895 coins come to mind. Yet, in top grades, otherwise common issues become condition rarities, with the finest known examples bringing prices that rival the “name brand” keys.

    1901 Morgan dollar from Legend’s Coronet Collection sale a ‘silent key’
    Legend Rare Coin Auctions will offer the second part of the Coronet Collection of Morgan dollars Oct. 15

    On Oct. 15, Legend Rare Coin Auctions will offer the second part of the Coronet Collection of Morgan dollars as part of its Regency Auction XIV. The auction will be held at The Bellagio hotel in Las Vegas as part of the Professional Coin Grading Service Members Only coin show.

    1901 Dollar a ‘Silent Key’

    The collection’s 1901 Morgan dollar has been graded PCGS Mint State 66 and was once part of Jack Lee’s magnificent dollar collection.

    By mintage alone, with nearly 7 million produced, it is not a rare issue. However, Mint State examples are elusive and base-level MS-60 examples trade for around $3,000. It is a rarity in grades finer than MS-63 with PCGS certifying just 34 in MS-64 (an example graded PCGS MS-64 sold for $51,700 at Heritage’s recent American Numismatic Association auctions), two in MS-65 and one example — the Coronet Collection’s — in MS-66.

    Click the below link to read the complete article:

    1901 Morgan Dollar Article – Click Here

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